Black Lives Matter

2017 Reading List #23: The Hate U Give, by Angie Thomas

I ordered The Hate U Give a few weeks ago about hearing about it on NPR’s Pop Culture Happy Hour. I’m a sucker for good young adult literature, so when one of the commentators referred to it as one of the best YA books she’d ever read, I had high hopes I’d love it, too.

And love it I did. The Hate U Give is an intensely powerful and emotional tale of a young girl who find herself at the center of a complicated situation—she witnesses the wrongful murder of her unarmed best friend at the hands of a police officer and must decide how to proceed. Starr is a kind and lovable heroine who lives in a world of duality. She lives in a rough neighborhood where gang violence is prevalent, but attends a ritzy private school where she is one of few non-white students, and these contrasts make for some pretty complicated decisions as a sixteen-year-old.

I think a big part of what I found most impressive about Angie Thomas’s debut novel is how she so deftly incorporates so many layers in an easy-to-read, quick-moving story. Starr has to deal with lots of complicated problems, from feeling like she’s not being true enough to her roots to confusion over why her friendships feel strained. Though she’s facing testimonies and a potential trial in which she would be the key witness, Starr also struggles with normal teenage problems that make her story universal.

On a lighter note, a major part of why I loved this book was how I related to Starr in a few very specific ways, despite us not having much in common on the surface. But when Starr and her friends discuss Harry Potter, the Jonas Brothers, and High School Musical at length? I felt that we were kindred spirits (and that maybe Angie Thomas and I need to be friends).

While reading The Hate U Give, I laughed aloud many times and had tears in my eyes on many occasions, including while reading Thomas’s acknowledgements at the end of the book. Thomas does not shy away from complicated subject matters, but she also never vilifies anyone. This book should be required reading for students—just yesterday I shared it with one of my college freshman who was anxious to get her own copy—because it does an incredible job of making this issue deeply personal.

I’m so thrilled that The Hate U Give already has a film adaptation in progress and that Thomas has a contract for a second book. After this stellar debut, I’m excited to follow her career.

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