historical fiction

Voyager

2016 Reading List #24:Voyager, by Diana Gabaldon

As of this evening, I’ve had a Master’s degree for two weeks now. Life has been weird (look for a follow-up post soon about other things that are happening in my life). The best of the upsides of this freedom? The time I can spend reading without any feelings of guilt. Ahhhh.

First on my reading to do list was finishing Voyager, the third installment in the Outlander series, after starting it in late March. Diana Gabaldon knows how to write a lengthy book, so though I had been making steady progress, I still had more than 300 pages to go when I took this on my quick jaunt to Orlando after graduation.

Thankfully, lengthy time spent on airplanes and in airports provides the perfect opportunity for some reading catch up, and I was happy to make a significant dent in my reading during my travels. That dent was big enough that I really couldn’t put the book down after I returned home.

Voyager covers lots of time and space in the Outlander world–we begin in 1968 where Dragonfly in Amber begins and ends, but eventually travel back through time to Scotland, followed by a journey to the West Indies, and ending in America. We’re also introduced to several new characters and revisit some surprising and familiar faces.

Though the beginning of the novel feels a million miles away since I started 2 months ago, one of my favorite aspects of Voyager was the development of Brianna, Claire and Jamie’s daughter. I was very thrown by the 20 year time jump in Dragonfly in Amber, but the more time I spent reading Voyager, the more satisfied I became with Gabaldon’s decision to mix up her narrative.

Finishing Voyager definitely left me itching to continue with the series, but I’m putting myself on hold so I can make more progress with other things I’ve been neglecting. Thankfully, the TV adaptation is only halfway through a great second season, so my Scottish-loving heart is still satiated.

Brooklyn

2016 Reading List #1: Brooklyn, by Colm Toibin

It’s really great to start my 2016 reading off with such an enjoyable novel. I fell in love with the movie adaptation of Brooklyn a few weeks ago and knew I needed to get my hands on the source text. It did not disappoint.

Apparently I’m in a bit of an Irish literary period, because my last read of 2015 was Martin McDonagh’s play The Cripple of Inishmaan. So basically all I want is to go to Ireland (preferably if it can be the 1950s) and enjoy life.

Brooklyn tells the coming-of-age story of Eilis (pronounced “ay-lish”) Lacey, a young woman who leaves her small Irish town for a job in Brooklyn. Eilis is a kind and mature young woman who can’t quite decide between being homesick and loyal to her Irish roots and beginning a new life in America.

This book is charming in every way, just like the film adaptation shows. It’s a story of romance, love, loss, and courage, but more than anything, it’s the story of a young woman finding her own way in life.

After devouring this novel, I’m interested in reading more of Colm Toíbín’s writing, especially his 2014 novel, Nora Webster, which seems to have character overlap with Brooklyn. 

Brooklyn was a perfect opener to great reading in 2016, and a lovely novel for a quiet winter weekend at home.

Dragonfly in Amber

Book #49: Dragonfly in Amber, by Diana Gabaldon

If you’ve followed my blog at all, you’ll know I fell in love with the Starz series Outlander about this time last year. I started watching it after reading good reviews and was instantly hooked by the characters, drama, romance, and beautiful setting of the show.

Though I knew the series was based on Diana Gabaldon’s book series, I didn’t really pursue reading the books until this past spring when the first season of Outlander returned for the second half of its premiere season. I soon became too anxious to find out what would happen next, so I decided the only way to find out was to get to reading.

Since season two of Outlander (sadly) won’t premiere until the spring of 2016, I haven’t tried to rush through Dragonfly in Amber, the second installment in the book series. My copy of the book rounds out at just under 1,000 pages, so it doesn’t exactly make for quick reading. But after starting the book at the very end of June, I’m happy to say I finished it on this crisp fall afternoon.

Though the majority of the action in Dragonfly in Amber takes place in the 1740s like Outlander, the opening and conclusion of the novel are set in 1968, with Claire as a mother revisiting Scotland for the first time, hoping to share her story with her daughter, Brianna. This frame narrative was quite surprising for me, but worked in a way I really enjoyed; it kept things in perspective about the future for Claire, but didn’t skip over any of the story that I was so intrigued by in the previous novel.

In the most general sense, this novel sees Claire and Jamie doing what they can to keep the war between the Scottish highlanders and the English at bay, since Claire knows the Scots fight a losing battle. The story takes them on a journey to France where we meet several new characters. By the novel’s end, we’ve also seen the deaths of several familiar characters, all of which were surprising to me. It’s important to note that Gabaldon is the type of writer who isn’t afraid to kill off major characters.

There were times in the novel when I felt like the pace dragged a bit, but I love that it ended with some very tender moments between Claire and Jamie and a pretty fantastic cliffhanger (though I must say it was less surprising for me since I know a bit about where the series is headed). I’m especially interested to see how Gabaldon plays with the time changes throughout the rest of the series, and I’m curious to see if the TV adaptation follows this same structure.

At this moment, I’d love to dive into Voyager, book three of the series, but I know that my seriously heavy semester of coursework won’t allow it. Thankfully I haven’t bought the book so I won’t be too tempted to abandon my required reading just yet. For now, I’ll keep myself busy, but I’m hoping to journey back to the Outlander world sometime this winter. Here’s hoping!