Scandal

Spring Break

Don’t get too excited — this isn’t going to be a post chronicling all the exciting adventures I’ve had in my days off. Actually, my spring break has primarily been spent sitting on my bed with either a screen or book in front of my face. This, of course, is my little version of paradise.

My spring break was made a little sweeter since we got an extra two days off because Kentucky has been a haven for major snow fall in recent weeks. Two weeks ago, we had a week off school for about a foot-and-a-half of snow and ice. Last Wednesday and Thursday, we received another 21-23″ that closed the university two days early for spring break. Now it’s 60 degrees. Things have been a bit odd in the weather department, to say the least.

Since it’s been a few weeks since my last post of this sort, I thought I’d take a few minutes to do another update. Here’s what I’ve been watching and reading lately.

Books — I haven’t accomplished as much reading over break as I’d hoped, but I’ll try to remedy that in my last days off. Earlier this week I finished Joan Didion’s The Year of Magical Thinking, a book I’d read partially several years ago, but came back to after borrowing it from my roommate. Didion’s nonfiction is relatable and comforting, especially if you’ve recently lost a loved one.

Last night, I finished Cecelia Ahern’s Love, Rosie, previously published as Where Rainbows End. I got it as a cheap Kindle download from Amazon, and knowing it was from the same author as P.S. I Love You (which I haven’t read), I hoped it’d be a decent book. I found the writing incredibly weak and the overall story rather boring and frustrating, so that was a pretty giant waste of time, unfortunately.

Now I’m turning back to my assigned school reading. My plan is to begin reading John Kennedy Toole’s A Confederacy of Dunces today. The book isn’t due for a few weeks, but since it’s long and, I’m assuming, fairly dense, I want to have ample time to finish it. I’ve also got some Flannery O’Connor short stories to read for classes next week, so I’ll try to get a head start on those. O’Connor is always a pleasure, so that’s something I’m excited about.

Movies — I haven’t watched much recently that’s very noteworthy, but I’m at least happy to be making progress on my intended watch list for the year. I rented two Redbox movies this week, Chasing Hearts and Men, Women & Children. The first was really lame; because Jamie Dornan is the film’s star, the distributors apparently tried to milk his Fifty Shades success, but the movie was mostly boring.

I rented Men, Women & Children because I really like Jason Reitman, but his movies have been rather off lately, especially since this was the first film he directed following the ridiculous Labor Day. The movie’s cast is good, but the story is rather melodramatic and depressing; it presents the dark side of a society controlled by technology. I was interested enough in the story to keep watching, but it’s not a film I’d watch a second time.

I also watched the film adaptation of Love, Rosie, which is thankfully far better than the book. The film’s writer and director took lots of liberties with the book’s story, and ended up producing something much more entertaining. It’s a pretty formulaic romantic comedy, but those can be fun, so I’d recommend it if you looking for something of that type.

TV — I think most of my viewing time this break has been spent on TV-bingeing. I started watching Teen Wolf on a whim just over two weeks ago, and I’m currently watching the final episode so I’ll be caught up when season five begins this summer. It isn’t a great show by any means, but it’s fun and entertaining, and I’m glad to have something to watch during the dry months of summer TV.

My mom and I also started watching Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt on Netflix. We got through the first five episodes in one sitting, but haven’t returned to it yet because our timing hasn’t really worked out, but I think I’ll plan to finish it now that I’m done with Teen Wolf. Once that’s done, I’ll return to Lost, since I paused in the break between seasons two and three.

As for on-air TV, I’m SO excited that Bates Motel returned this week. It looks like things have officially gotten inappropriate this season, so that should be loads of fun. It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, Broad City, and Girls will all be reaching season’s end in the next week or so, so that should lighten my TV-watching load a bit (though I’m sad to see them all go). Otherwise, I’m still keeping up with Jane the Virgin, Reign, and Scandal, and I believe I’ll wait until the summer to binge on the current season of Broadchurch with my mom, so that will slowly begin building up on our DVR.

Now back to real life. Here’s to soaking up my last moments of no obligations before school and all those pesky deadlines and assignments return.

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Snow Days

I couldn’t be happier to be writing this from the comfort of my bed, snuggled under a pile of blankets with snow falling outside my window. My semester got off to a busy start, so I thought I’d take this moment of reprieve to write a quick update of my pop culture life these days.

Books — School reading obviously takes precedent over any leisurely reading, but I’m still free enough that I’m able to maintain something for myself. After forging my way through a book of William Inge plays, I took a sharp turn to reading Daniel Handler’s The Basic Eight, a fun teen novel about murder (I guess it doesn’t sound that funny, but it really is). My latest Southern lit reading assignment was Erskine Caldwell’s Tobacco Road, a super strange and darkly comic book chronicling the strange lives of a group in Depression-era rural Georgia. It’s a truly entertaining read. This past weekend I finished My Ideal Bookshelf, a collection of lists made by various celebrities of the handful of book they’d put on their “ideal” bookshelves. It was especially fun to read the lists of celebrities I like (like James Franco), and the book provided me with several books I’ve added to my own reading list.

Currently, I’m in the middle of reading Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Hound of the Baskervilles and I’m enjoying the experience tremendously. I’ve also started Ernest Hemingway’s short story collection In Our Time, a book I’m required to present about in one of my classes next month. This snow day (which just might turn into two snow days) is giving me the perfect opportunity to stay in and read guilt-free.

Movies — I’m well on my way with my 100 movie goal for 2015, having watched 23 new movies this year. Some recent favorites include the classic Pulp Fictionwhich I hadn’t seen until recently, and Still Alice, the movie for which Julianne Moore is likely to win an Oscar. Admittedly, I also got really into this Lifetime movie called Restless Virgins that I watched on Netflix, so I guess that should make the list as well. Sometimes you need something mindless to watch, I guess.

TV — I’m not sure I’ve ever felt so busy with TV-watching as I do now. I’m making pretty good progress on my rewatch of Lost (I’m currently watching episode 2×15), but I’m also kept very occupied by all the normal TV shows I watch that are airing. This list includes: Downton Abbey, Girls, Bob’s Burgers, Jane the Virgin, Parks and Recreation, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, Broad City, Scandal, Reign, and How to Get Away with Murder. It’s both sad and a little stress-relieving that Parks and Rec and How to Get Away with Murder will be ending in the coming weeks so my watch list can be pared down a bit. However, Bates Motel, Game of Thrones, and Veep will all be returning soon, so the madness continues, I suppose. For now, though, I’m content to stay in my bed and enjoy my cozy day inside.

November.

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Though November is pretty much my favorite month of the year, it’s also an undoubtedly busy time. I’m eleven weeks into the semester, which means that things are generally winding down, but also that finals and exams and presentations and papers are all happening. This is really the first time I’ve been behind in any classes, which is a pretty good accomplishment (and probably a reason why I shouldn’t be sitting here writing this instead of reading Hamlet). Sometimes you just need a break.

 

TV  — Thankfully, I’ve still managed to keep up with my pop culture fun to a certain extent. On Monday, I finished my viewing of “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia,” because Netflix was kind enough to add the ninth season just a few days after I finished season 8. I thoroughly enjoyed myself watching thisshow, and I’m very excited FX is already showing a preview for next season.

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As for my other TV viewing habits, I’m just trying to keep up with the influx of fall shows. I’ve only added two new shows to my schedule this season: ABC’s “How to Get Away with Murder” and The CW’s “Jane the Virgin.” “How to Get Away with Murder” provides the same melodramatic fun that I love about “Scandal,” and “Jane the Virgin” is adorable and funny and totally worth watching. I’m also keeping up with returning shows like “American Horror Story: Freak Show,” “Scandal,” “Bob’s Burgers,” “Reign,” and “America’s Next Top Model.” I’m waiting until Thanksgiving/Christmas break to binge the new season of “Homeland” with my mom. We’ve seen the first two episodes, but decided it would be easier to wait than to try to catch up little by little, so don’t spoil things, please!

Movies — As of yesterday, I’ve completed my goal of watching 125 new movies in 2014! I haven’t seen many in theaters recently, apart from Gone Girlwhich you really all should have seen by now because it’s wonderful. I’m definitely looking forward to the onslaught of awards season movies that are starting to roll out now; I’m specifically excited for Birdman, Nightcrawler, The Imitation Game, Foxcatcher, Wild, Into the Woods, and seeing Whiplash again. As for the movies I have seen recently, some favorites have included Obvious Child, In A World…, and Scream 1, 2, and 3. Netflix doesn’t have Scream 4 right now, which is fairly frustrating. I also had the distinct pleasure of watching the notoriously bad Showgirls recently which was certainly an experience.

Books — Most of my reading has been focused on completing my reading assignments for class, which is pretty understandable considering I’m in an English Master’s program. My biggest projects there have been Hamlet (which I’m behind on) and Antony and Cleopatra (which our professor removed from the reading list, but since I’m already three acts in, I want to finish it). I’m also working away at reading lots of Edgar Allan Poe short stories since I have a class specifically dedicated to Poe. For my final class, most of my reading has been from a very helpful book called Critical Theory Today: A User-Friendly Guide that goes in-depth on various critical theories used to analyze literature. It’s great for lit nerds, not so great for the casual reader.

For my own funIMG_0667.JPG reading, I’ve only done three noteworthy reading projects of late, but all of them are worth mentioning. Early in October I bought and read Lena Dunham’s Not That Kind of Girl, which I enjoyed (if you’re interested, I’m on Dunham’s side in this “sexual abuse” situation, but I also don’t want to start a debate). Though it wasn’t my favorite read ever, there were many laugh-out-loud moments and I thought it was a very true representation of what Dunham has always claimed to be. I also read Samuel Beckett’s Waiting For Godot in October in my quest to read all the important drama literature. The play is frustrating and sad, like lots of those written in the absurd style. Currently, I’m reading Amy Poehler’s Yes Pleasewhich is of course entertaining and funny. I expect to finish it this weekend, so look out for a post with my review.IMG_0683.JPG

And to cap it all off, Taylor Swift’s newest album, 1989, was released last week, meaning that I won’t really be listening to any other music until at least January. My favorite songs at the moment are “Blank Space,” “Style,” and “I Wish You Would.” But I basically adore the entire album because Taylor is a goddess and I’ve worshiped her for six years.

Now, back to the real world. It’s the weekend and after spending the afternoon at our homecoming football game, I know I should be thinking about completing the homework that’s been accumulating on my to do list. Right now, though, the idea of curling up in a blanket on the couch watching movies for the rest of the night sounds so, so much better. A girl can dream, I guess.

 

 

 

 

 

Emmy Hopes and Predictions: Drama

After lots of internal dilemmas, I’ve come up with my predictions for the Emmy nominees for this year’s drama categories. I think I’d just be happier if the Academy would give out like 3 awards for some categories, because sometimes choosing one person is just too tough. Look out for upcoming posts about my feelings on the comedy and miniseries/movie categories.

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series

  • Michelle Dockery, Downton Abbey
  • Claire Danes, Homeland
  • Robin Wright, House of Cards
  • Lizzy Caplan, Masters of Sex
  • Kerry Washington, Scandal
  • Julianna Margulies, The Good Wife

Kerry Washington

As I mentioned in my introduction, picking one person is hard, especially because I’m a fan of four of these actresses. Since I didn’t enjoy House of Cards when I tried watching it and I’ve never seen The Good Wife, I’ve knocked Robin Wright and Julianna Margulies out of my running, but that of course doesn’t mean they’re unlikely to win. Claire Danes is always great, but I don’t think she’s as likely to win this year. My gut says Kerry Washington is going to be victorious, unless it goes to Margulies after what many have said was the show’s best season. And for the record, Michelle and Lizzy are both winners in my heart. (I’m also still mourning the fact that Vera Farmiga wasn’t nominated this year, so there’s that).

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series

  • Bryan Cranston, Breaking Bad
  • Jon Hamm, Mad Men
  • Woody Harrelson, True Detective
  • Matthew McConaughey, True Detective
  • Jeff Daniels, The Newsroom
  • Kevin Spacey, House of Cards

Bryan Cranston

Let’s just get this out in the open right now: I will not be pleased if True Detective sweeps the drama categories. I thought the show was good, but not nearly as great as everyone else made it out to be. Needless to say, I do not want Harrelson or McConaghey to win, though they both gave great performances. Bryan Cranston undoubtedly deserves a prize for the final season of Breaking Bad, and I really hope he gets it. If anyone else wins, I’m expecting it to be one of the True Detective men, and my guess is that McConaughey has the stronger chance of the two.

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series

  • Anna Gunn, Breaking Bad
  • Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey
  • Christina Hendricks, Mad Men
  • Joanne Froggatt, Downton Abbey
  • Lena Headey, Game of Thrones
  • Christine Baranski, The Good Wife

Lena Headey

Another tough category, because I watched five of these performances (sorry, Christine Baranski), and they’re all award-worthy. Since Anna Gunn won last year, I’m not sure she’ll do it again, especially since her role was smaller in the final episodes of Breaking Bad. I don’t really think Maggie Smith would win again, though to be clear, she’s only won in this category once, in 2012. She also won in 2011 when Downton Abbey was still considered a miniseries. As much as I like Christina Hendricks, I don’t think she had the screen time or narrative relevance to win. And though I love Joanne Froggatt and she gave a great performance this season, I don’t think it’s very likely she’ll win. So I guess that leaves me with Lena Headey! I think she’s got a good shot, especially for her first nomination, and I’d be happy to see her win. But really, any of these ladies could win and I’d be supportive. Whatever.

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series

  • Aaron Paul, Breaking Bad
  • Jim Carter, Downton Abbey
  • Peter Dinklage, Game of Thrones
  • Mandy Patinkin, Homeland
  • Jon Voight, Ray Donovan
  • Josh Charles, The Good Wife

Aaron Paul Mandy Patinkin

My emotions are confused yet again. Though I’ve not seen Jon Voight’s or Josh Charles’s performances, I think Charles has a good shot at an award from what I’ve heard of this season of The Good Wife. But when I look at the shows I do watch, I’m again perplexed. Even though Aaron Paul has won several times before, I think he again has a great shot for the final episodes of Breaking Bad. I adore Jim Carter, but there’s no way he’ll win. Peter Dinklage definitely has a solid chance, especially considering his great performance in what was a very difficult season for Tyrion. Personally, though, I think I’d vote for Mandy Patinkin, mostly because I love him and I don’t know if he’ll ever win for Homeland. Emotions aside, I think the two strongest contenders are Aaron Paul and Josh Charles.

Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series

  • Diana Rigg, Game of Thrones
  • Kate Mara, House of Cards
  • Allison Janney, Masters of Sex
  • Kate Burton, Scandal
  • Margo Martindale, The Americans
  • Jane Fonda, The Newsroom

Allison Janney

I really hope Allison Janney has this one in the bag, but I can’t be sure. She’s absolutely who I’d vote for; she’s amazing as the sweet, charming, and pitiful Margaret Scully, and totally deserves an award for her performance. I don’t even want to talk about the other nominees, so I won’t.

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series

  • Paul Giamatti, Downton Abbey
  • Reg E. Cathey, House of Cards
  • Robert Morse, Mad Men
  • Beau Bridges, Masters of Sex
  • Joe Morton, Scandal
  • Dylan Baker, The Good Wife

Joe Morton

I’ve seen four of these performances and think this category is pretty wide open. My personal vote would be for Joe Morton because he’s so deliciously evil as Olivia Pope’s dad. His character is the definition of “love to hate him.” However, this is the last chance for Robert Morse to win (even though it’s weird that he’s always been considered a guest and not a supporting actor), and Beau Bridges is great on Masters of Sex. Paul Giamatti was perfectly sleazy on Downton Abbey, but again, I don’t think he’s got a real shot. This category could be a bit of a surprise.

Outstanding Drama Series

  • Breaking Bad, AMC
  • Mad Men, AMC
  • House of Cards, Netflix
  • Downton Abbey, PBS
  • Game of Thrones, HBO
  • True Detective, HBO

Breaking Bad

I really, really hope that Breaking Bad repeats its win from last year. The win would be completely and absolutely deserved, but I’m afraid that True Detective will sneak up and take the cake. As far as I’m concerned, there’s no question about which show deserves to win, and I hope voters feel the same as I do.

Year in Review: Top 10 Favorite TV Shows of 2013

For this list, I’ll just be sticking to the shows I have on my TV Bucket List, because if I attempted to cover all the shows I watch regularly, I’d probably be here for days. 2013 was a year of eclectic TV watching for me, so this will be a rather varied list. Here goes nothing!

Bates Motel

1. Bates Motel, A&E, completed May 2013

I’m a huge advocate for this show, so be prepared for some fangirling here. Bates Motel is a modern-day prequel to the Alfred Hitchcock classic Psycho, and, though that may seem a daunting challenge, the show certainly lives up to its predecessor. Freddie Highmore and Vera Farmiga give fantastic performances as Norman and Norma Bates, who are probably the most compellingly dysfunctional mother-son pairing since Oedipus and Jocasta. This shows moves easily from creepy to sad to hilarious and pulls riveted viewers through lots of twists and turns. Season two premieres in 2014, and I’ll anxiously be waiting for that moment until it happens.

Breaking Bad

2. Breaking Bad, AMC, completed January 2013

I really only watched a season-and-a-half of Breaking Bad in 2013 if you don’t count the final eight episodes, but that certainly doesn’t diminish its status as one of the greatest shows of the year, and probably in TV history. There isn’t much to say about it except that I’m still reeling over the final episodes, and so very happy with the show’s conclusion. In essence, this is a perfect show, despite its many terribly dark and disturbing moments. You’d be surprised how quickly you think meth dealing might be a viable career option.

Dawson's Creek

3. Dawson’s Creek, Netflix, completed December 2013

I’m kind of stretching the truth on my completion date as I’ve still got one season to go, but at the rate I’ve sped through the past three seasons, it’s safe to say I’ll be done before the end of the month. I was looking for an easy and fun show to balance out some of the dramas and comedies I’d been watching, so I turned to Dawson’s Creek on a whim, and I’m very happy with the decision I made. First of all, the show has totally changed my feelings about Katie Holmes (the moment when someone FINALLY happened tp mention Tom Cruise’s name to Joey was probably the highlight of my week) and I’ve developed such a crush on Joshua Jackson (or maybe just Pacey Witter… it’s kind of hard to say). Though the stories can get a bit dramatic, I’ve really enjoyed watching the show, especially because of the varied and well-developed teenage females that are somewhat rare in television. If you’re ever feeling nostalgic for the 1990s, this is a must-see.

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4. Downton Abbey, PBS, completed March 2013

Even though I do a lot of binge-watching, there are only a few shows that with which I become truly obsessed, and Downton Abbey has earned its place among the chosen few. Watching Downton is kind of the equivalent of snuggling up on the coach with a hot tea and a good book on a winter day. It’s comforting, heartbreaking, and hilarious, and just British enough to make Americans feel somehow more cultured. It’s safe to say I’ve never cried harder for TV than I did watching Sybil’s death, largely because Tom Branson is basically my favorite fictional human ever (okay, that may not be true, but I just have a lot of favorites). This is perfect for binge-watching over the holidays, especially since the fourth season premieres in the US in January.

Game of Thrones

5. Game of Thrones, HBO, completed March 2013

I have to admit, I was a bit slow on the uptake with this one, but I’m very glad I persevered. After watching the first two episodes in January and feeling underwhelmed, I decided to give it another try in March before the premiere of season three. After overcoming the difficulty of attempting to remember all the characters’ names, I became totally enraptured with the many layered stories in the show. Nerd culture is cool largely in part to this show, so give it a chance if you haven’t. But be warned, the “it’s not porn, it’s HBO” slogan could basically just be applied to just this one show. A word to the wise: this isn’t the kind of show you want to stream in a public place unless you’re looking for some serious embarrassment.

Scandal

6. Scandal, ABC, completed October 2013

I was very reluctant to start Scandal, but when my roommate started watching it, I decided to join in, and it ended up being totally worth it. The first season, which is only seven episodes long, drove me a little crazy, but it still kept enough of my attention to keep me moving with the show. Then, at some point in season two, it just got better; the stories got more interesting and less episodic, the characters developed in unexpected ways, and the chemistry between Olivia Pope and Fitzgerald Grant is too hot to ignore. As an added bonus, Jeff Perry and Joshua Malina are fantastic in two secondary roles that can almost always be relied on for a few laughs during tense episodes. This is a total guilty pleasure show, and since it’s only in season three, it isn’t hard to catch up if you’re interested. On an unhappy note, the show’s last new episode for the fall airs this week and it won’t return until February 27, and they recently cut season three’s total run from 22 to 18 episodes. A serious bummer, but still totally worth a watch.

Top of the Lake

7. Top of the Lake, Sundance Channel/Netflix, completed August 2013

Top of the Lake is perfect if you’re looking for an quick and enticing show to stream over the holidays. It’s a miniseries that premiered last year at the Sundance Film Festival and is now available on Netflix, and with only seven episodes, you can easily cruise through it in a day or two. Mad Men‘s Elisabeth Moss stars as a cop searching for a pregnant 12-year-old who goes missing at the end of episode one, and the series follows this search and the lives of the strange characters who populate a small New Zealand town. The show at times is both dark and violent, but the story is so interesting you won’t be deterred. Also, Holly Hunter gives a great performance as a total weirdo, so that’s always a plus.

Twin Peaks

8. Twin Peaks, Netflix, completed June 2013

Twin Peaks is a show I’ve heard my mom talk about for years, so this summer, I finally decided to sit down and watch the 30-episode show on Netflix, and it was definitely worth it. (Side note: it’s interesting to watch this before Bates Motel or Top of the Lake, because you’ll see definite similarities in these newer programs). Twin Peaks is about a small community near the Canadian border in Washington that’s populated by a rather eclectic group of people. When a high school sweetheart’s body washes is found in the pilot episode, an FBI agent is brought in to investigate the case. I would say that some of the show’s intrigue wanes toward the end of season two, but there are many moments that will both freak you out completely (I’m serious) and will haunt your nightmares (there are a few images that I still see every time I wake up in the middle of the night, and it isn’t pleasant). This is a bizarre show, but it’s very fun to watch, especially since it plays with various aspects of comedy, horror, and melodrama in a way that keeps viewers guessing.

Veep

9. Veep, HBO, completed June 2013

If you’re interested in watching Veep, the best advice I can give you is to stick it out through season one to get to season two. On the plus side, season one is only eight episodes, so it’s easy to cruise through the opening season when it appears the show was still figuring itself out. Season two, however, flows perfectly, and viewers will certainly see why Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Tony Hale took home top awards at the Emmys this year for their performances. One line I repeat over and over is that I think the role of Vice President Selina Meyer was absolutely written for Julia Louis-Dreyfus, because she has an uncanny talent for making unlikeable characters intensely likeable. If you’re looking for something smart and funny, this is the show for you.

thewonderyears

10. The Wonder Years, Netflix, completed August 2013

Aside from Dawson’s CreekThe Wonder Years is the longest show I completed this year (I’m still watching Seinfeld and Cheers, so those don’t really count). This is the kind of show to watch with your family; it has endearing characters, moments of happiness and sorrow, and an historical context that adds a layer of complexity to an often lighthearted show. Watching Kevin Arnold and his friends grow up in often funny, sweet, and sad, especially when you get to the final season and realize how much the actors changed over the show’s course. This is an easy show to stream while you’re doing other things since the plot lines are never very complicated, and it’s a pretty comforting way to spend your time. Also, if you’re at all a fan of the new ABC comedy The Goldbergs, you should absolutely watch The Wonder Years since they’re basically the same show, just set in different decades.

What new shows did you discover in 2013? What are you looking forward to next year?

My recent life in photos.

Since starting my senior year of college (!!!), I haven’t been as diligent in updating on here, so I thought it might be best to give a quick photo update that can catch everything up. FYI, not all of those are my photos.

532171_493987600700437_1563504247_nThis picture is going to be my blanket representation for school. Oh, school. It’s been a busy start to the year, hence my lack of posts. However, it’s also been fun, with highlights including: moving into my own lovely apartment, a great start to football season, a job I’m very thankful for, reaching the final interview process for Teach for America, and making progress on my thesis project. Hooray!

'salem's Lot

I’m currently reading ‘salem’s Lot, but I’ve been making very slow progress. However, I have two books I’m looking forward to this month, so my plan is to crack down and finish this soon. Expect further updates soon.

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I go to a lot of concerts, so think was my eighth Taylor Swift show and my third time seeing Ed Sheeran (yeah, lots of concerts). Another great show, though I was sick (and so was Taylor), so that was kind of a bummer. This picture also makes me really happy because of Ed’s Grumpy Cat hat and Game of Thrones shirt which basically mean we’re soul mates.

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Another concert! This was actually two days after the Taylor show, so I had a busy weekend. This was my first real fun. concert (I saw them perform at the Grammy nominations concert last December) and it was a great show. The weather was perfect, the venue was perfect, the show was perfect. If there only had been fewer smokers, it was have been an absolutely perfect evening.

Scandal

At this very moment, I’m watching episode 11 of season 2 of Scandal, one of TV’s most talked-about shows. I must say, I don’t exactly understand why so many people think this show is so great, but I’m interested enough to keep watching the show. There are lots of things that drive me insane while watching (if someone refers to the president as “the leader of the free world” one more time I’ll probably kill something), but the show has progressively improved, so I’m sticking with it. If nothing else, it’s a mindless guilty pleasure, and I can definitely use one of those as I recover from the conclusion of Breaking Bad.

Enough Said

This was the last movie I saw in theaters, and one that I imagine will get overlooked or be unavailable to lots of audiences, but if you have the chance to see it, you absolutely should. Julia Louis-Dreyfus is one of my favorites, and she proved her acting abilities in this  rare big screen performance. James Gandolfini’s performance is equally fabulous and quite touching in light of his recent, untimely death. The story here is light, but holds many touching moments, and I felt personally connected to the relationship between Julia’s character and her daughter (mostly just when they’re getting along, though). I imagine Enough Said is a long shot for any Oscar nominations, but I have high hopes that it will receive some much-deserved recognition at the Golden Globes.

So, as mundane as this all may seem, these are the recent happenings in my life. I realize I put a lot of emphasis on pop culture items, but, you know, that’s basically what my life revolves around, so those are the important things to me. Now back to the reality of school work. Hooray.